10 Classic Novels Everyone Should Read In Their Twenties (Part Two)

Answering the question 'What makes a novel a classic?' is a challenging task. What exactly is the common thread that brings a diversity of titles, from various genres and centuries, under this illustrious label? Although I'm sure that there are plenty of opinions on the subject, for me it's something about the universality of a … Continue reading 10 Classic Novels Everyone Should Read In Their Twenties (Part Two)

Review: ‘Killing Commendatore’ by Haruki Murakami

"...sometimes in life we can't grasp the boundary between reality and unreality. That boundary always seems to be shifting. As if the border between countries shifts from one day to the next depending on their mood. We need to pay close attention to that movement, otherwise we won't know which side we're on." You would … Continue reading Review: ‘Killing Commendatore’ by Haruki Murakami

Review: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami

 "One heart is not connected to another through harmony alone. They are, instead, linked deeply through their wounds. Pain linked to pain, fragility linked to fragility. There is no silence without a cry of grief, no forgiveness without bloodshed, no acceptance without a passage through acute loss. That is what lies at the root of … Continue reading Review: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami

Winter Warmers: 5 Books To Cosy Up With This Winter

The season of good cheer is upon us, and not only because I am able to wear my reindeer hat without shame. For those engaged in a love affair with literature, bitter cold and biting wind mean an excuse for blankets and books. While many decry the seemingly-unending darkness, bibliophiles can rejoice in long evenings … Continue reading Winter Warmers: 5 Books To Cosy Up With This Winter

Review: The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

As I said in my last review, I have not been giving myself the easiest time with my reading choices. I seem to be moving quickly from one difficult read to another, without much pause. From William Styron's troubling masterpiece Sophie's Choice, to Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, my recent selections have hardly been uplifting. … Continue reading Review: The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver